Introduction to Succession Planning - Financial advisers, investment, wealth management and pensions advice - Ginkgo Financial Ltd
Wealth, just like your health, must be carefully preserved

Introduction to Succession Planning

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TAX TREATMENT VARIES ACCORDING TO INDIVIDUAL CIRCUMSTANCES AND IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE.

ESTATE PLANNING IS NOT REGULATED BY THE FINANCIAL CONDUCT AUTHORITY.

WILL WRITING IS NOT PART OF THE QUILTER FINANCIAL PLANNING OFFERING AND IS OFFERED IN OUR OWN RIGHT. QUILTER FINANCIAL PLANNING ACCEPT NO RESPONSIBILITY FOR THIS ASPECT OF OUR BUSINESS.

THE VALUE OF PENSIONS AND INVESTMENTS AND THE INCOME THEY PRODUCE CAN FALL AS WELL AS RISE. YOU MAY GET BACK LESS THAN YOU INVESTED.

 

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Planning now for the inevitable fact that we won’t be around for ever is one of the kindest things we can do for our loved ones. That way, when the worst happens, at least your financial affairs will be one less thing to worry about.

The first step is always to make a will, and we make sure that every new client has one. A well-drafted will sets out how your estate will be divided. It also makes sure your loved ones – particularly children, step-children and unmarried partners – are looked after when you are gone.   

If you’ve been carefully building up assets throughout your life, you probably want to pass on as much of your estate as you can to your family when you die. If you don’t plan ahead, the part of your estate that exceeds the inheritance tax threshold of £325,000 could be taxed at 40%. That means that your family may miss out on a significant portion of your wealth. You don’t have to be particularly wealthy to leave behind a large inheritance tax bill when you die. But there are ways to invest that could help you to pass on more of your wealth to your family.